Sessions

Main Hall sessions

Kamil Baluk: The Polish school of Reportage. Is there a Polish way of writing nonfiction? Kamil Bałuk is coordinator of the Polish School of Reportage at the Institute of Reportage in Warsaw. This is a yearly cycle of masterclasses for experienced journalists who want to plunge specifically into the genre of narrative long reads-reportages. Forty people per year learn how to find a good story for their future long reads, prepare themselves before traveling, dealing with interviewees, forming an engaging story and pitching the results to major publishers. What does Kapuscinski’s ‘The Emperor’ tell us about Poland? Who is the narrator of Hana Krall’s books – people or the author herself? Kamil will talk about Polish non-fiction. Because Polish people love reportages 9.45 – 10.20 Afua Hirsch: Brit(ish) – diverse and authentic voices of others”]Last February, Sky- and Guardian-journalist Afua Hirsch published the book Brit(ish), revealing the crisis of identity in Britain and the country’s failure to provide British people of diverse backgrounds with a sense of belonging and inclusion. Drawing on her own life, and decades of working on issues of social justice, equality and the politics of identity and immigration, Afua has written a book for anyone who has experienced outsiderness or otherness themselves, or who cares about the profound differences alienating British people today . She will talk about how she found her voice as a storyteller. And why is it so important to incorporate the diverse and authentic voices of others. 10.30 – 11.20 Henk Blanken & Eric Smit on narrative tools for investigative journalists (Dutch spoken)”]Please read the following article in preparation for this session (in Dutch): De rücksichtslose zelfverrijking van een politiek zwaargewicht

IJ Hall/Publishers' Hall sessions

0.30 – 11.20 Christian Lerch: the making of ‘Papa we’re in Syria'”]Radio writer and producer Christian Lerch will talk about his award-winning radio documentary ”Papa, we’re in Syria“ (RBB/WDR 2016). Based around the recorded voice messages of the protagonists, the documentary closely follows the struggle of a father and his two estranged sons, a family conflict that turns into a fight over beliefs and values, with dramatic consequences. Following their conversations for more than two years, the listeners gets drawn into the process of rationalizing and fighting the radicalization of family members. Lerch will focus his talk on the narrative structure of the documentary. With radio producer Joost Wilgenhof, he discusses creating empathy and listener involvement. They will also talk about the differences in storytelling traditions in Germany and the Netherlands and the use of private recordings. 11.40 – 12.30 Kamil Baluk: Alle kinderen van Louis / All of Louis’s children”]’De spermamaffia. De lekkende spermatanks van dokter Jan Karbaat’ (‘Sperm mob. The leaking sperm tanks of doctor Jan Karbaat’). this sensational title caught the eye of 26-year-old Polish journalist Kamil Bałuk in early 2014. He came across a short article in the Belgian magazine HUMO while sitting in a cafe in Warsaw and knew instantly that he wanted to give the story a try. More than two years later, he finished a book, interviewing along the way the half-Dutch, half-Surinamese sperm donor Louis, who fathered 200 children in the Netherlands, as well as many of his biological children, who are spread across the country. He also talked to infamous doctor Jan Karbaat months before he died. To understand how it all could happen in the Netherlands, he travelled in time to 1950s conservative Holland and 1900’s Suriname. The book comes out in Dutch in April. How did Kamil find his voice – a narrator that could connect 1950s conservative Holland with 1900s Suriname and the present day reader? 1.30 – 2.30 Publishers’ Session: Going non-Dutch (with Joris Luyendijk) part 1″]How does our place in Europe influence the stories we tell? Together with the Dutch Foundation for Literature, the Initiative Narrative Journalism Netherlands organizes a special session at the conference for publishers, authors and journalists on how our local perspective defines our take on the world. Take for instance a topic like the financial crisis: how do Europeans view the banking crisis, from Hungary to Sweden? Dutch anthropologist Joris Luyendijk wrote a successful book on the London City, “Swimming with Sharks”. He will elaborate on how he reported about the city as a foreigner and an outsider. Joris also shares with us how he found his voice as a narrator and if that voice transcends cultures and languages. Then, four of his publishers reveal how his book was received in their country. In Germany for instance, the book didn’t sell as well as expected. Yet in Sweden it was in the top 10 for weeks. How come? How do the publishers explain how the book was received? And how did the book fit into the narrative traditions of their respective countries? How does our place in Europe influence the stories we tell? Together with the Dutch Foundation for Literature, the Initiative Narrative Journalism Netherlands organizes a special session at the conference for publishers, authors and journalists on how our local perspective defines our take on the world. Take for instance a topic like the financial crisis: how do Europeans view the banking crisis, from Hungary to Sweden? Dutch anthropologist Joris Luyendijk wrote a successful book on the London City, “Swimming with Sharks”. He will elaborate on how he reported about the city as a foreigner and an outsider. Joris also shares with us how he found his voice as a narrator and if that voice transcends cultures and languages. Then, four of his publishers reveal how his book was received in their country. In Germany for instance, the book didn’t sell as well as expected. Yet in Sweden it was in the top 10 for weeks. How come? How do the publishers explain how the book was received? And how did the book fit into the narrative traditions of their respective countries?

STUDIO/How to sessions

Using imagination to tell a true story”] During the conference, Docking Station organizes a cross-media session: Crossing Borders, Where do we go from here? This afternoon we not only look across national borders, but we also share the insights from different disciplines. Five story makers, working with all sorts of media, come together to think together, and with the audience, about the journalistic stories of the future. A good story consists of a catchy beginning, an intriguing middle and a satisfying ending. But how do you construct that? The storytelling strategies of the photographerfilmmakerwritergraphic journalist and radio journalist are different and that is interesting, because it is precisely in cross-fertilization that you can get tips from others to make a story stronger.


The five speakers at ‘Crossing Borders, where do we go from here?’ all work with different media to highlight the same theme: migration. It is a subject that is much in the news and many listeners and readers are also turning off . Despite news media reporting on migration issues on a daily basis, the messages are barely received with full attention. There is so much written about it, we can’t even delete the photos from our retina. Saying “migration” we immediately see orange life jackets appear before our eyes. Images of thousands of migrants waiting at a border are all known to us; but are they still moving us? It is a problem that contemporary storytellers are constantly confronted with. The speakers in our program looked for alternative methods to communicate their message in their projects. The power of imagination is an element that can strongly push a story forward. How do you use your imagination to tell a journalistic story, so that the deeper relevance becomes visible, and the story gets a longer shelf life? Should a storyteller always show the literal fact or can he transfer the urgency of the story and subject by using a metaphor? 11.40 – 12.45 Docking Station Track: Cross-media – Using imagination to tell a true story”]During the conference, Docking Station organizes a cross-media session: Crossing Borders, Where do we go from here? This afternoon we not only look across national borders, but we also share the insights from different disciplines. Five story makers, working with all sorts of media, come together to think together, and with the audience, about the journalistic stories of the future. A good story consists of a catchy beginning, an intriguing middle and a satisfying ending. But how do you construct that? The storytelling strategies of the photographerfilmmakerwritergraphic journalist and radio journalist are different and that is interesting, because it is precisely in cross-fertilization that you can get tips from others to make a story stronger.


The five speakers at ‘Crossing Borders, where do we go from here?’ all work with different media to highlight the same theme: migration. It is a subject that is much in the news and many listeners and readers are also turning off . Despite news media reporting on migration issues on a daily basis, the messages are barely received with full attention. There is so much written about it, we can’t even delete the photos from our retina. Saying “migration” we immediately see orange life jackets appear before our eyes. Images of thousands of migrants waiting at a border are all known to us; but are they still moving us? It is a problem that contemporary storytellers are constantly confronted with. The speakers in our program looked for alternative methods to communicate their message in their projects. The power of imagination is an element that can strongly push a story forward. How do you use your imagination to tell a journalistic story, so that the deeper relevance becomes visible, and the story gets a longer shelf life? Should a storyteller always show the literal fact or can he transfer the urgency of the story and subject by using a metaphor? 1.30 – 2.20 How to session 1: Create your own multimedia story with ‘Slices’ developer Wouter Vroege “]The session consists of a short introductory talk, followed by 45 workshop in which participants create their first Slices Story. Bring your own laptop!


Wouter Vroege presents his new and free storytelling service ‘Slices‘. This browser app allows storytellers to create and publish a multimedia story without the intervention of software developers or designers. Seeing lots of beautiful visual stories online that only work on the 27″ iMac they where designed on, time has come to build a format that primarily targets majority of the web: mobile devices. 2.30 – 3.20 How to session 2: Ten practical steps toward writing with a strong voice with Mark Kramer”]Ten practical steps towards writing with a strong voice. Want to write a story that sculpts readers’ ongoing emotions and understanding? Here’s what Mark Kramer suggests in his new book Little Read Writing Book: Theorize early on, adjust ​theory ​midstream​, ​note dialogue ​and​ how people speak and otherwise show their personalities. Notice signs of micro-emotions, and the sensory details of settings, and the tensions and conflicts (both stable and evolving), and the bursts of action, and the slow moving action, and the moments of insight (characters’ and yours)—and while gathering up all that, don’t interview much until way late. If you follow this method, you’ll end up with rich, human-scale notes full of scenes related to your big topic, that can most easily be described in a friendly, informal voice. 3.45 – 4.35 How to session 3: Crossing Borders – storytelling in an online world with Emile Costard, Maria Feck & Eefje Blankevoort”]

Emile Costard (Le Monde), Maria-Elisabeth Feck (Spiegel online) and Eefje Blankevoort (Prospektor, Netherlands) are three digital multi-talents: they take a subject and use audio, video, the written word, drawing, gaming and photography to tell a story, adding different layers with each medium. They will each introduce one of their projects, briefly explaining why they chose these diverse way of telling the story, and then give you one assignment to work on. Learn to switch from one form to another to tell your story in the best possible way, using all the possibilities of the online world.

 

Workspace/Round table sessions

0.30 – 11.20 Round table 1: an editor from Le Monde shares an issue”]In this Round Table Session, Emile Costard from Le Monde coins the following question: How do I free people up to work on bigger stories and lift more complex projects off the ground, amidst the day-to-day hassle of the newsroom?


How do we get more focus on how we tell our stories and not just on what to bring? A big and successful project like The New Arrivals project, should we do it more often? And if so, how can we find the resources to do so? In our Round Table sessions, editors of media from different countries bring to the table a problem they are trying to deal with. Every hour a new editor takes place at the head of the table. Meet people from all over the continent and get to learn the different ways of working. The journalists at their table are also invited to come up with out-of-the-box solutions for the editor’s problem. Obviously, the conference’s one size fits all-solution for the editors would be: Go narrative… 11.40 – 12.30 Round table 2: an editor from The Guardian shares an issue”]In this Round Table Session, Mark Rice-Oxley, head of special projects at The Guardian, coins the issue of dealing with stress and mental health in the newsroom.


How do we get more focus on how we tell our stories and not just on what to bring? A big and successful project like The New Arrivals project, should we do it more often? And if so, how can we find the resources to do so? In our Round Table sessions, editors of media from different countries bring to the table a problem they are trying to deal with. Every hour a new editor takes place at the head of the table. Meet people from all over the continent and get to learn the different ways of working. The journalists at their table are also invited to come up with out-of-the-box solutions for the editor’s problem. Obviously, the conference’s one size fits all-solution for the editors would be: Go narrative… Dutch television producer shares an issue”]In this Round Table session, Dutch television producer Floor Koomen presents a particular issue he faced in his career: Once upon a time a filmmaker came to him with very unique undercover footage of the child porn industry in the Philippines. The footage was as shocking as poor in quality, the storytelling wasn’t well rounded. Both elements are key to his usual choices. A firm “no’ was at hand. But the revealing nature of the footage made him think twice. It could pose a great opportunity to ‘fight’ a horrific injustice. Should he get in this story and help the filmmaker produce a documentary with this material for his high quality and artistic slot or not?


How do we get more focus on how we tell our stories and not just on what to bring? A big and successful project like The New Arrivals project, should we do it more often? And if so, how can we find the resources to do so? In our Round Table sessions, editors of media from different countries bring to the table a problem they are trying to deal with. Every hour a new editor takes place at the head of the table. Meet people from all over the continent and get to learn the different ways of working. The journalists at their table are also invited to come up with out-of-the-box solutions for the editor’s problem. Obviously, the conference’s one size fits all-solution for the editors would be: Go narrative… 1.30 – 2.20 Round table 4: an editor from Spiegel Online shares an issue”]In this Round Table Session, Eva Thöne will coin the issue of reporting on crime by migrants and refugees. Eva Thöne is deputy head of the culture department of Spiegel Online, the online news site of Germany’s leading political magazine. She is joined by Der Spiegel photographer Maria Feck (Spiegel Online): “I‘ve written a lot about whether we should publish the nationality when a migrant/refugee commits a crime – on one hand its part of transparent reporting, on the other hand it fuels rightwing sentiments every time.” 


How do we get more focus on how we tell our stories and not just on what to bring? A big and successful project like The New Arrivals project, should we do it more often? And if so, how can we find the resources to do so? In our Round Table sessions, editors of media from different countries bring to the table a problem they are trying to deal with. Every hour a new editor takes place at the head of the table. Meet people from all over the continent and get to learn the different ways of working. The journalists at their table are also invited to come up with out-of-the-box solutions for the editor’s problem. Obviously, the conference’s one size fits all-solution for the editors would be: Go narrative…[/lvca_panel][/lvca_accordion][lvca_accordion style=”style3″][lvca_panel panel_title=”3.45 – 4.35 Round table 5: an editor from El País shares an issue”]In this Round Table Session, Carlos de Vega from El País coins the issue of organizing video teams within a large journalistic organization. Carlos de Vega is in charge of the video operation at EL PAIS. In the last three years, this field has become extremely complex. EL PAIS produces video for social media, live video, short formats, documentaries, news features, Instagram stories…. De Vega’s team of 15 people are doing more and more things. Should he hire specialists or team players who can do it all? Should they produce all kinds of material or concentrate on certain formats? In brief, how do you organize your video team in your organization?


How do we get more focus on how we tell our stories and not just on what to bring? A big and successful project like The New Arrivals project, should we do it more often? And if so, how can we find the resources to do so? In our Round Table sessions, editors of media from different countries bring to the table a problem they are trying to deal with. Every hour a new editor takes place at the head of the table. Meet people from all over the continent and get to learn the different ways of working. The journalists at their table are also invited to come up with out-of-the-box solutions for the editor’s problem. Obviously, the conference’s one size fits all-solution for the editors would be: Go narrative…